Friday, May 7, 2010

The Value of Trees

From the Trees Are Good website:

How much are your trees worth? Most likely more than you think. Homeowners invest a lot of time, care, and money into landscaping their property, expecting beauty and shade in return. But the unexpected "return" on that investment is that trees have monetary value as well.

When you stop to consider that landscaping can be worth up to 20 percent of your home's total property value, you'll understand why it's worthwhile to protect the investment you've made in your greenery. According to the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA), a tree's value is based on four factors: tree size, tree type, tree condition, and overall tree location based on its functional and aesthetic purposes. A professional tree and landscape appraiser can determine where your trees or plants fall under these categories.

Of course, none of the examples above cover issues relating to habitat, wetlands and water courses and so forth. But in terms of basic tree values around a house, the illustration is useful starting point.


Make use of this Tree Benefits Calculator to figure out the ecosystem services value of your trees!



General Facts About Trees (from Trees are Good website)
  • Trees keep our air supply fresh by absorbing carbon dioxide and producing oxygen.
  • In one year, an acre of trees can absorb as much carbon as is produced by a car driven up to 8700 miles.
  • Trees provide shade and shelter, reducing yearly heating and cooling costs by 2.1 billion dollars.
  • Trees lower air temperature by evaporating water in their leaves.
  • The average tree in metropolitan area survives only about 8 years!
  • A tree does not reach its most productive stage of carbon storage for about 10 years.
  • Trees cut down noise pollution by acting as sound barriers.
  • Tree roots stabilize the soil and prevent erosion.
  • Trees improve water quality by slowing and filtering rain water as well as protecting aquifers and watersheds.
  • Trees provide protection from downward fall of rain, sleet, and hail as well as reduce storm run-off and the possibility of flooding,
  • Trees provide food and shelter for wildlife.
  • Trees located along streets act as a glare and reflection control.
  • The death of one 70-year old tree would return over three tons of carbon to the atmosphere.

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